28 Horror Books You Will Freeze While Reading

Horror books are just as effective as horror movies. It makes us shudder at once and we can get excited while reading the lines.

Here are 28 books you will read with fear:

The Shining by Stephen King

The Shining is a horror novel by Stephen King, first published in 1977. It tells the story of Jack Torrance, a struggling writer. He takes a job as the caretaker of the isolated Overlook Hotel in the Rocky Mountains.

This novel has themes of isolation, madness, and the supernatural. Readers encounter grisly and suspicious situations.

The Exorcist by William Peter Blatty

The Exorcist is a horror novel by William Peter Blatty, published in 1971. It tells the story of Regan MacNeil, a young girl. She becomes possessed by a demon. And the two priests who try to save her.

The novel explores themes of good and evil, faith and doubt, and the nature of evil. It is a classic of the horror genre.

Dracula by Bram Stoker

Dracula is a horror novel by Bram Stoker, published in 1897. It tells the story of Count Dracula, a vampire.

He travels from Transylvania to England in search of new victims. And the group of people who try to stop him. The novel explores themes of good and evil, the supernatural, and the power of the human will.

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

Frankenstein is a novel by Mary Shelley, published in 1818. It is a classic of the Gothic genre and is one of the first science fiction novels. The novel tells the story of Victor Frankenstein, a young scientist. He creates a monster from dead body parts and brings it to life.

The novel explores themes of science, morality, and the nature of life. This novel features fully developed characters and thought-provoking complex ideas.

The Call of Cthulhu by H.P. Lovecraft

The Call of Cthulhu is a short story by H.P. Lovecraft, published in 1928. It is part of the Cthulhu Mythos, a shared universe of horror stories created by Lovecraft and other writers. The story follows the narrator as he investigates the mysterious cult of the eponymous creature. He is a monstrous being from another world.

The story explores themes of the supernatural, madness, and the limits of human understanding. It has an eerie atmosphere and its imaginative use of Lovecraft’s cosmic mythology.

The Silence of the Lambs by Thomas Harris

The Silence of the Lambs is a novel by Thomas Harris, published in 1988. It is a psychological thriller that tells the story of Clarice Starling, a young FBI trainee.

Her mission is to catch the serial killer named “Buffalo Bill”. To do so, she must turn to the infamous cannibalistic serial killer Dr. Hannibal Lecter for help. The novel explores themes of psychology, crime, and the nature of evil.

Carrie by Stephen King

Carrie is a horror novel by Stephen King, published in 1974. It is the author’s first published novel and is a classic of the genre. This novel is the story of the bullied Carrie White. She abused by her classmates and her religious fanatic mother.

However, Carrie has telekinetic powers that she must learn to control to survive. The novel explores themes of bullying, abuse, and the supernatural.

The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson

The Haunting of Hill House is a horror novel by Shirley Jackson, published in 1959. It is a classic of the genre. This novel is one of the greatest haunted house stories of all time. The novel tells the story of four people. They go to Hill House and study the supernatural.

As they spend more time in the house, they begin to experience increasingly terrifying and inexplicable events. The novel explores themes of the supernatural, madness, and the power of the mind. It has an eerie atmosphere and its psychological depth.

The Amityville Horror by Jay Anson

The Amityville Horror is a horror novel by Jay Anson, published in 1977. It is based on the alleged true story of the Lutz family. She thinks evil spirits are present in her new home in Amityville, New York.

The novel tells the story of the family’s terrifying experiences in the house and their struggle to survive and escape. The novel explores themes of the supernatural, possession, and the nature of evil.

Psycho by Robert Bloch

Psycho is a horror novel by Robert Bloch, published in 1959. It is based on the true story of serial killer Ed Gein. He was the inspiration for several famous fictional serial killers, including Norman Bates from the novel and its adaptations.

The novel tells the story of Norman Bates, a young man who runs a small motel in rural America. He has a deeply disturbed and dangerous relationship with his mother. The novel explores themes of madness, obsession, and the nature of evil. It has a chilling and suspenseful narrative.

The Omen by David Seltzer

The Omen is a horror novel by David Seltzer, published in 1976. It is the basis for the film of the same name. It tells the story of the Thorn family, who discover that their young son, Damien, is the Antichrist.

The novel follows the family as they struggle to protect themselves and the world from Damien’s malevolent influence. The novel explores themes of religion, evil, and the end of the world. It has a suspenseful and atmospheric storytelling.

Salem’s Lot by Stephen King

Salem’s Lot is a horror novel by Stephen King, published in 1975. It is a classic of the vampire genre and is one of the author’s best and most terrifying works. The novel tells the story of a small town in Maine. A horde of vampires led by the mysterious and malevolent Mr Barlow haunts them.

The novel follows a group of characters. They try to survive and destroy the vampires before it is too late. The novel explores themes of good and evil, the supernatural, and the power of belief.

The Wolfman by Curt Siodmak

The Wolfman is a 1941 American horror film written by Curt Siodmak. It starring Lon Chaney Jr. as the titular Wolfman. The director of this movie is George Waggner and Lawrence Talbot is the main character in this movie.

The Wolfman is a classic example of the Universal monster movies of the 1930s and 1940s. It has spawned numerous sequels and remakes over the years.

The Witch of Blackbird Pond by Elizabeth George Speare

The Witch of Blackbird Pond is a historical fiction novel for young adults, written by Elizabeth George Speare and published in 1958. The book is in Puritan Connecticut in the late 17th century, and it tells the story of a young girl. Her name is Kit Tyler. People accuse her of being a witch.

Kit must navigate the strict rules of Puritan society. She proves her innocence to avoid being punished for her supposed crimes. The novel explores themes of intolerance, conformity, and the dangers of judging others based on appearances. It won the Newbery Medal in 1959.

The Necronomicon by H.P. Lovecraft

The Necronomicon is a fictional book. It created by the horror writer H.P. Lovecraft. It is mentioned in many of Lovecraft’s stories. It is never actually described or quoted in any of his works. The Necronomicon is said to contain ancient and forbidden knowledge that is too dangerous for mortal minds to comprehend.

It is often associated with the ancient god Cthulhu and other monstrous entities from Lovecraft’s mythos. The Necronomicon has become a popular subject in horror and fantasy fiction, and many real books have been published under the title “The Necronomicon” over the years.

The Thing by John W. Campbell Jr.

The Thing is a science fiction novella by John W. Campbell Jr. It was published in 1938 and tells the story of a group of scientists who discover a mysterious, alien spacecraft in the Antarctic.

The scientists soon realize that the spacecraft contains a terrifying creature that can mimic and assimilate any living organism. The Thing is a classic example of the “cosmic horror” genre and has been adapted into several films, including the 1982 film of the same name.

The Island of Dr. Moreau by H.G. Wells

The Island of Dr. Moreau is a science fiction novel by H.G. Wells, first published in 1896. The book is about a man named Edward Prendick who is shipwrecked on an island where he discovers that a mad scientist named Dr. Moreau has been conducting gruesome experiments to transform animals into human-like creatures. The novel explores themes of science and ethics, and the consequences of playing God.

The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde

The Picture of Dorian Gray is a novel by Oscar Wilde, first published in 1890. The book is about a young man named Dorian Gray who is obsessed with his beauty. Dorian makes a wish that his portrait, which has been painted by his friend Basil Hallward, would age instead of him.

Dorian’s wish is granted, and he remains young and handsome while the portrait becomes increasingly grotesque. The novel explores themes of youth, beauty, and the corruption of the soul.

The Turn of the Screw by Henry James

The Turn of the Screw is a novella by Henry James, first published in 1898. The book is a ghost story about a young governess who is hired to care for two children at a remote estate.

The governess soon begins to see the ghosts of a former governess and her lover, who are haunting the estate and trying to possess the children. The Turn of the Screw is known for its ambiguous and psychological portrayal of the ghosts and the governess’s mental state.

The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe

The Raven is a poem by Edgar Allan Poe, first published in 1845. The poem is one of Poe’s most famous works. It is a classic of the Romantic era. The poem is written in the first person, and it tells the story of a man who is visited by a raven, a bird associated with death and darkness.

The man becomes increasingly agitated as the raven continues to repeat the word “nevermore,” and he eventually goes mad. The Raven is about haunting imagery and its exploration of themes of loss, despair, and madness. The producers paradoxically and imitated this issue.

The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Leroux

The Phantom of the Opera is a novel by Gaston Leroux, first published in 1910. The book is about a mysterious figure. The Phantom haunts the Paris Opera House. The Phantom is a disfigured musician who becomes obsessed with a young singer named Christine, and he manipulates the events of the opera to make her a star.

The novel explores themes of love, obsession, and the dark side of human nature. It has been adapted into numerous plays and films, including the famous musical by Andrew Lloyd Webber.

The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

The Yellow Wallpaper is a short story by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, first published in 1892. The story is a first-person narrative told by a woman.

She is suffering from postpartum depression. She is confined to her bedroom by her husband, who is a doctor. The woman becomes increasingly obsessed with the yellow wallpaper in her room, and she begins to see a woman trapped behind the wallpaper.

The story is a powerful exploration of the effects of mental illness and the dangers of the “rest cure” treatment. It was commonly prescribed for women at the time. It has been widely anthologized and studied in literature classes.

The Reanimator by H.P. Lovecraft

The Reanimator is a horror story by H.P. Lovecraft, first published in 1922. The story is a series of six vignettes that follow the adventures of a mad scientist named Herbert West who has discovered a formula that can reanimate the dead.

West uses his formula to bring many corpses back to life, but the reanimated bodies are violent and uncontrollable, leading to disastrous consequences. The Reanimator is a classic example of Lovecraft’s “cosmic horror” style.

The Invisible Man by H.G. Wells

The Invisible Man is a science fiction novel by H.G. Wells, first published in 1897. The book is about a scientist. His name is Griffin who discovers a way to make himself invisible, but he is unable to reverse the process.

Griffin becomes increasingly mad and violent as he struggles to cope with his invisibility, and he terrorizes the town of Iping where he is staying. The novel explores themes of science, isolation, and the dangers of unchecked ambition.

The Dunwich Horror by H.P. Lovecraft

The Dunwich Horror is a horror story by H.P. Lovecraft, first published in 1929. The story is in the town of Dunwich, Massachusetts, and it follows a young man named Wilbur Whateley who is born to a family with a dark and ancient heritage.

Wilbur grows at an alarming rate and becomes increasingly monstrous, and he eventually summons an ancient and terrifying entity known as the Dunwich Horror. The story is a classic example of Lovecraft’s “cosmic horror” style.

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari by Robert Wiene

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari is a silent horror film, directed by Robert Wiene and released in 1920. The film is in a German town. It follows a man named Francis who tells the story of a traveling sideshow run by a madman named Dr. Caligari. Caligari’s main attraction is a sleepwalker.

His name is Cesare who can predict the future. But Francis soon realizes that Cesare is under Caligari’s control. They’re using him to commit murder. The film has Expressionist style. Its innovative use of lighting and set design. It is a classic of the horror genre and has been widely studied and imitated.

The Time Machine by H.G. Wells

The Time Machine is a science fiction novel by H.G. Wells, first published in 1895. The subject of this novel is about the time machine of a scientist. His nickname is the Time Traveller.

The Time Traveler travels to the year 802,701, where he discovers a future society divided into two distinct classes: the Eloi, who are gentle and childlike, and the Morlocks, who are brutish and subterranean. The novel explores themes of evolution, class, and the effects of progress on society.

The War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells

The War of the Worlds is a science fiction novel by H.G. Wells, first published in 1898. The book is about a Martian invasion of Earth. Martians are advanced alien beings who came to Earth with tripod-like machines. Their aim is to destroy people and take over cities.

This novel is the story of an unnamed hero who witnesses the invasion and struggles to survive. The War of the Worlds is one of the pioneers of the science fiction genre. It is the source of inspiration for many films and works of art.

What is Horror Book?

When people read horror books, they encounter supernatural forces and violent themes. Horror books can be novels, novellas, short stories, or anthologies, and they often explore themes of fear, death, and the unknown.

Horror novels can be part of a specific subgenre. They are supernatural horror, psychological horror, or splatterpunk. Lovecraft, Stephen King, and Edgar Allan Poe. Horror novels have been popular throughout history and continue to be popular among readers today.

What is The Scariest Book Ever Read?

Some people might find a book like Stephen King’s The Shining to be the scariest book they have ever read, while others might find a book like H.P. Lovecraft’s The Call of Cthulhu to be the scariest. Ultimately, what makes a book scary is highly subjective and can vary from person to person.

What is The Best Horror Story?

Some people might consider a story like Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Tell-Tale Heart” to be the best horror story, while others might consider a story like H.P. Lovecraft’s “The Dunwich Horror” to be the best.

Ultimately, what makes a horror story “good” is a matter of personal taste and can vary from person to person.

What is A Horror Book Called?

A horror book is a “horror novel” or simply a “horror”. It is a book that is part of the horror genre. It is a genre of fiction and it scares and shocks the reader through the use of supernatural or violent themes.

Who is The King of Horror Books?

Stephen King is the “king of horror books”. He is an American author. Stephen King has written many horror novels, short stories, and novellas. He is the most popular and influential author of the horror genre.

Some of King’s most famous works include The Shining, Salem’s Lot, and It. He has sold over 350 million copies of his books worldwide and has won numerous awards for his writing, including the Bram Stoker Award and the National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. The characters in King’s works are lively, psychologically deep, and show the darker side of human nature.

What is The Oldest Horror Story?

However, some of the earliest known works of horror fiction are the Epic of Gilgamesh, which is an ancient Mesopotamian epic poem dating back to the 18th century BCE, and the Tale of the Shipwrecked Sailor, which is an ancient Egyptian story from the Middle Kingdom (2040-1782 BCE).

These stories contain elements of the supernatural and the uncanny, and they may have influenced later works of horror fiction.

What are The 3 Genres of Horror?

There are many different subgenres of horror, but some of the most common ones include:

  1. Supernatural horror: This subgenre deals with supernatural entities, such as ghosts, vampires, werewolves, and demons. These stories often involve characters who must confront and defeat supernatural threats to survive.
  2. Psychological horror: This subgenre focuses on the effects of horror on the human mind, and it often involves characters who are struggling with mental illness or psychological trauma. These stories often use psychological suspense and ambiguity to create a feeling of unease and dread.
  3. Slasher: This subgenre focuses on violent and often gory acts of murder, often committed by a masked killer. These stories often involve a group of young people who are hunted and killed one by one.

Other common subgenres of horror include body horror, eco-horror, and cosmic horror.

Why is Horror So Popular?

Horror is a popular genre because it appeals to people’s primal fear of the unknown and the supernatural. They often explore our deepest fears and anxieties, and they can provide a sense of catharsis and release for readers and viewers.

Horror stories have a purpose other than to scare. When people read some horror stories, they can also learn about social and philosophical issues.

Additionally, horror can be a way for people to confront their fears and gain a sense of control over them. Fear is a popular content in all eras. People are always curious about new horror movies, books and TV shows.

Who is The Best Horror Villain?

Some people might consider a character like Hannibal Lecter from The Silence of the Lambs to be the best horror villain, while others might consider a character like Freddy Krueger from A Nightmare on Elm Street to be the best.

Ultimately, what makes a horror villain “good” is a matter of personal taste and can vary from person to person.

Who Was The First Ever Horror Character?

There were people who tried to guess who the first horror character was. Since the concept of fear changes over time, there is no specific standard. Horror stories are “horrifying” content.

The earliest horror works are the Epic of Gilgamesh and the story of the Sunken Seaman. We can say that the characters in these stories are the oldest “horror” characters. Monsters, demons, supernatural beings and supernatural events are the main contents of the novels.

What is The Smallest Horror Story?

The “smallest” horror story is, as the length of a story does not necessarily determine its quality or effectiveness as a horror story.

However, some very short horror stories have become famous, such as the six-word horror story “The last man on Earth sat alone” by Edgar Allan Poe, and the eight-word horror story “For Sale: Baby shoes, never worn” attributed to Ernest Hemingway.

These stories are very brief, but they can create a sense of horror and unease through their use of implication and ambiguity.

Who is The Youngest Horror Writer?

The “youngest” horror writer is, as there is no minimum age requirement for being a writer. Many young people have written horror stories and novels, and some of them have even become successful and well-known writers in the horror genre.

Some examples of young horror writers include Mary Shelley, who wrote the novel Frankenstein at the age of 19, and Christopher Pike, who wrote the novel Scavenger Hunt at the age of 18.

It is also worth noting that many horror writers start writing at a young age but do not become successful until they are older, so it is impossible to determine the “youngest” horror writer with certainty.

What are the 10 Elements of Horror?

  1. Supernatural or otherworldly beings: Horror stories often involve supernatural or otherworldly entities, such as ghosts, vampires, werewolves, and demons. These entities are often malevolent and seek to harm or terrorize human characters.
  2. Violence and gore: Horror stories often include violent and gory scenes, such as mutilations, bloody killings, and torture. These scenes are intended to shock and disgust the reader or viewer, and they can be an important part of the horror experience.
  3. Psychological horror: This type of horror focuses on the effects of horror on the human mind, and it often involves characters who are struggling with mental illness or psychological trauma. These stories can use psychological suspense and ambiguity to create a feeling of unease and dread.
  4. Atmosphere and setting: Horror stories often take place in eerie and atmospheric settings, such as abandoned houses, dark forests, and desolate towns. These settings can contribute to the sense of fear and danger in the story.
  5. Jump scares: This is a common technique used in horror stories and films, where a sudden and unexpected event, such as a loud noise or a sudden appearance, is used to surprise and frighten the reader or viewer.
  6. Suspense and tension: Horror stories often build suspense and tension through the use of suspenseful music, carefully-paced pacing, and foreshadowing. These techniques can create a feeling of unease and anticipation in the reader or viewer, and they can make the horror elements of the story more effective.
  7. The unknown and the unexplained: Horror stories often involve elements that are mysterious and unexplained, such as strange occurrences, bizarre events, and inexplicable phenomena. These elements can add to the sense of fear and uncertainty in the story.
  8. Evil and malevolent characters: Many horror stories include malevolent characters who are evil and seek to harm other characters. These villains can be human, supernatural, or otherworldly, and they can add to the sense of danger and fear in the story.
  9. Loss of control: Horror stories often involve characters who lose control over their lives and their surroundings. This can happen through the actions of the malevolent characters, or it can be a result of the characters’ actions or mental states. This loss of control can create a feeling of helplessness and vulnerability in the reader or viewer.
  10. The monstrous: Horror stories often involve monstrous or aberrant creatures, such as zombies, mutants, and other grotesque beings. These creatures are often depicted as being inhuman and violent, and they can add to the sense of fear and revulsion in the story.

What are The Four Types of Horror Styles?

There are many different subgenres of horror, and what constitutes a “horror” story can vary depending on who you ask. However, some common subgenres of horror include:

  1. Supernatural horror: This subgenre deals with supernatural entities, such as ghosts, vampires, werewolves, and demons. These stories often involve characters who must confront and defeat supernatural threats to survive.
  2. Psychological horror: This subgenre focuses on the effects of horror on the human mind, and it often involves characters who are struggling with mental illness or psychological trauma. These stories often use psychological suspense and ambiguity to create a feeling of unease and dread.
  3. Slasher: This subgenre focuses on violent and often gory acts of murder, often committed by a masked killer. These stories often involve a group of young people who are hunted and killed one by one.
  4. Gothic horror: This subgenre is characterized by its use of dark and atmospheric settings, such as old castles, abandoned mansions, and fog-shrouded cemeteries. These stories often involve supernatural elements and explore themes of madness, decay, and the supernatural.

What are The 3 Rules to Survive a Horror Movie?

There is no surefire way to survive a horror movie, as they are fictional stories and not real life. However, some tips for surviving a horror movie include:

  1. Don’t do anything stupid: In many horror movies, the characters make poor decisions that put them in danger, such as splitting up, going into dark rooms alone, or ignoring obvious warning signs. If you want to survive a horror movie, try to avoid making these kinds of mistakes.
  2. Stay calm and think logically: Panic and fear can cloud your judgment and make it harder for you to escape from danger. If you find yourself in a scary situation, try to stay calm and think logically about how to get out of it.
  3. Don’t trust anyone: In horror movies, it is often the case that the people you trust the most, such as friends and family members, turn out to be the ones who are trying to harm you. If you want to survive a horror movie, be prepared for the possibility that anyone could be a threat.